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09/12/2009 by
105590 views

Google Maps Shows Australian Shark Attack?!

Recent Google Maps images of Sydney’s popular Bondi Beach show a massive school of unidentified sharks cruising just meters away from swimmers.

sharks

Visit Australian Coastal Watch and zoom in to take a closer look at the sharks. Pretty amazing, but scary stuff.

Sorry, that shark bite was not real. It’s a simple, clever but smart promo for Shark Week by Discovery Channel. The campaign was created by agency Jack Watts Currie, in Sydney.

Some more interesting information about the campaign?

The Australian Coastal Watch website was set up to be as legitimate looking as possible, without looking ‘too over produced’ or suspicious. The link to the site was seeded entirely through email and unpaid social networking sites like twitter, Facebook, Digg and StumbleUpon.

The agency created a Twitter account and timed our ‘shark warning’ tweets to coincide with a 3 KM Bondi Beach ocean swim event, which everyone was tweeting about.

The agency also used it’s personal accounts to retweet the link using various different search words like: shar, google, bondi, ocean swim, warning, etc.

The viral element was part of a larger ‘ambush’ campaign, which included online ads, a little bit of print and some radio.

Tell us how you rate this campaign.


 

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